Manushi  More than a Magazine-A Cause
Manushi  More than a Magazine-A Cause
Manushi Sangathan  Working Towards Solutions

 
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Note -We have had to temporarily suspend the publication of Manushi
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Brief History
 
The Name and its Meaning
More than a Journal – A Cause
The Impetus for Starting Manushi Magazine
How We Put It Together
Mobilizing Support and Finances
How We Worked
Who Reads Manushi?
Support and Distribution Network
Open Door Policy for Volunteers
Make Common Cause with Manushi
 


Support And Distribution Network

Throughout the years we have maintained active contact with many Manushi readers and supporters. Distribution is largely looked after by its readers – individuals, women’s groups, women and men activists working in a range of social and political organisations.

Since we could never afford the large sums of money needed for publicity campaigns, many Manushi readers have done this job in their own areas, using their own initiative and resources. As soon as the first issue appeared, some of the women journalists in national newspapers wrote review articles even though we had not sent them review copies, simply because within a week we had no copies left. Several regional language papers have written about Manushi, after chancing upon a copy somewhere, and Manushi articles are frequently translated by readers into different languages and published in regional papers.

Individual readers and several political groups have also helped publicise Manushi in their areas by putting up posters, distributing leaflets, organising Manushi stalls at public places, fairs and conferences, and enrolling subscribers. This is how Manushi reached areas where we had no direct contacts.

One person comes across a copy of Manushi, and not only shares it with her friends but asks for extra copies – five, ten, twenty, fifty or a hundred – which she then sells or uses to enrol new subscribers. Sometimes, this has led to the emergence of new groups and organisations because, while persuading others to buy Manushi, these people have been able to start discussion on important social issues in their own areas or workplaces.

A number of progressive political groups working in urban and rural areas, often mostly men at first, also began to help with Manushi distribution. In the process, some of the organisations started a women’s group as an important component of their political activity.

Several groups use Manushi as reading and discussion material with women who are being initiated into political work. Many individual women who had been completely outside the efforts of women’s and other political groups have begun to be actively involved after reading Manushi and asking us to put them in touch with other interested women or political groups in their areas.

By these means, Manushi has travelled to remote areas, small towns and some rural areas where we had no direct contacts. It has also travelled to far away countries. Essays from the journal are included in the reading curriculum of numerous universities abroad.

The letters published in each issue of Manushi convey only a fraction of the sympathetic identification and loving support Manushi has received from so many people. We regularly correspond with hundreds of people who write to us long letters of sharing and see Manushi as a way of breaking out of their isolation and coming in contact with other concerned citizens.

Since we could never afford the large sums of money needed for publicity campaigns, many Manushi readers have done this job in their own areas, using their own initiative and resources.

Individual readers and activist groups have also helped publicise Manushi in their areas by putting up posters, distributing leaflets, organising Manushi stalls at public places, fairs and conferences, and enrolling subscribers. Sometimes, this has led to the emergence of new groups and organisations because, while persuading others to buy Manushi, these people have been able to start discussion on important social issues in their own areas or workplaces.

By these means, Manushi has travelled to remote areas, small towns and some rural areas. It has also travelled to far away countries. Essays from the Journal are included in the reading curriculum of numerous universities abroad.

Some of our readers come from far away to meet us, work with us, help with Manushi work during their vacations, invite us to their homes, and have become close friends. The affection and care we have received in this way has been important source of emotional sustenance and inspiration.

During many periods, the group of individuals working regularly on Manushi have had limited skills and resources at their command. The fluctuating nature of voluntary work means that important skills are not always available to us. However, what could have been a liability has become something of strength in that we have developed a habit of drawing on the ideas, skills, experience and ability of anyone and everyone who expresses the desire to be associated with Manushi.

Thus, the energy and commitment of a wide range of people with differing background has, over the years, contributed to Manushi’s survival and growth. This includes, senior bureaucrats, lawyers, police officials, scientists, students, university, college and schoolteachers as well as volunteers from foreign countries. A steady stream of well-educated, highly skilled volunteers from abroad, including young Non-Resident Indian have proved to be helpful for Manushi’s survival.

  Books, Films and
 
Music Cassettes
• Zealous Reformers, Deadly Laws
This book, by one of pioneers of the contemporary women's rights movement in India, delves deeply into legislation and law enforcement to (Read more...)
 
• Deepening Democracy
Challenges of Governance and
Globalization in India
(Oxford University Press)
MADHU PURNIMA KISHWAR
Deepening Democracy brings together essays on enduring issues such as human rights, governance, and the impact of globalization on the Indian citizen. The covers a range of issues
(Read More…)
 
• Women Bhakta Poets:
Contains accounts of the life and poetry of some of the most outstanding women in Indian history from the 6th to the 17th
century — Mirabai, Andal, Avvaiyar, Muktabai, Janabai, Bahinabai, Lal
Ded, Toral, Loyal. Many of these poems had never neen translated into english before  (Read More…)
 
Off the Beaten Track: Rethinking Gender Justice for Indian Women (OUP)
Religion at the Service of Nationalism and Other Essays (OUP)
In Search of Answers: Indian Women’s Voices from Manushi
Gandhi and Women
Voices from the Save Himalaya Campaign: Interview with Sunderlal and Vimla Bahuguna (Hindi)
Roshni: A Street Play & Manushi Geet (Hindi)
Six documentary films by Madhu Kishwar
Cards and T-Shirts
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